AG Schimel Appoints Anna J. Wildeman New Environmental Protection Unit Director

Jan 10 2018

MADISON, Wis. – Today, Attorney General Brad Schimel named Assistant Attorney General Anna J. Wildeman the Wisconsin Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Environmental Protection Unit (EPU) Director and Assistant Attorney General Bradley J. Motl the unit’s deputy director.

 

“I’m incredibly proud of EPU, which, last year, had the highest total case value in any year in the agency’s history,” said Attorney General Schimel. “AAGs Wildeman and Motl have been an integral part of the unit’s success in recent years and I am excited to have them lead this important unit.” 

Prior to joining DOJ in 2016, Ms. Wildeman was a Committee Executive and Policy Counsel for Environment and Agriculture at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C. Before joining the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, she was a partner at a large Midwest law firm and counseled clients on permitting and compliance issues, regulatory enforcement actions, managed environmental due diligence, and developed regulatory and legislative solutions.

Ms. Wildeman attended Northeastern University for undergraduate studies, and earned her Juris Doctor cum laude from Vermont Law School.  

 

Mr. Motl has been an Assistant Attorney General in the Wisconsin Department of Justice’s Environmental Protection Unit since May 2012. Prior to graduating cum laude from the University of Wisconsin Law School, Mr. Motl earned a Ph.D. and M.S. in nuclear engineering and engineering physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

Wildeman replaces David P. Ross who was appointed by President Donald J. Trump as Assistant Administrator of the Office of Water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

 

DOJ is moving expeditiously to begin the recruitment to fill the vacancy created by Mr. Ross’ departure, and ensure the unit is fully staffed.

 

EPU enforces state environmental laws by prosecuting violations referred to the attorney general by environmental regulatory agencies or at the request of district attorneys. Most environmental violations are referred to DOJ by the Department of Natural Resources.